“Every week, my husband throws up the garbage.”

Paper HelpWhy does he eat it?

Translation: « Chaque semaine, mon mari vomit les poubelles. »

Why wrong: In English there are thousands of expressions called phrasal verbs that use a particle (i.e. a preposition or adverb) after a verb. Examples of particles are up, down, in, out, on and off. Using the wrong particle can change the meaning, often quite humorously. If you mean to put something in the garbage, say throw out not throw up (vomit).Someone Who Can Help

Correct it:Every week, my husband throws out the garbage.”

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“The surgeon operated my mother.”

Machine OperatorReally? Is she a machine?

Translation: « Le chirurgien a fait fonctionner ma mère. »

Why wrong: In English there are thousands of expressions called phrasal verbs that use a particle (i.e. a preposition or adverb) after a verb.  Examples of particles are up, down, in, out, on and off. Omission of the particle can change the meaning, often quite humorously.  Someone can operate a machine, but surgeons operate on people.Potential

Correct it: “The surgeon operated on my mother.”

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“My car broke.”

Broken CarReally? Send it to the scrap yard!

Translation: « Mon auto a fracturé. »

Why wrong: In English there are thousands of expressions called pProblem Solvedhrasal verbs that use a particle (i.e. a preposition or adverb) after a verb.  Examples of particles are up, down, in, out, on and off. Omission of the particle can change the meaning, often quite humorously.

Correct it:  My car broke down.

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