Anglaide https://www.anglaide.com Le perfectionnement de l'anglais par Internet Tue, 12 Feb 2019 04:14:09 +0000 en-CA hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 https://www.anglaide.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/cropped-Logo_Anglaide_web_4in-32x32.png Anglaide https://www.anglaide.com 32 32 “I didn’t do my homeworks.” https://www.anglaide.com/homeworks/ Tue, 29 Jan 2019 15:51:50 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2227 Why wrong:  Homework, like information, is a non-count or mass noun. Mass nouns are used for masses like sand that are too big to count their individual parts.  That means that they can’t be plural or take an indefinite article (a or an means one, which is a number). In French, mass nouns are signified by du, de la or de l’.  For more information, click here. Correct it: With mass nouns, don’t use indefinite articles (a homework) or try to make them plural (homeworks). “I didn’t do my homework.”. Are you still planning your goals for 2019?  Make better communication

The post “I didn’t do my homeworks.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“I revised my notes before the test.” https://www.anglaide.com/revised/ Thu, 20 Dec 2018 05:05:33 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2007 What?  You changed them? Translation:  « J’ai changé mes notes avant l’examen. » Why wrong:  Revise is a false friend. It doesn’t always mean réviser.  What are “false friends?”  False friends are words from different languages which look similar but have different meanings. There are over 1,000 false friends between English and French. Correct it:  What is meant here is review as in “I reviewed my notes before the test.” Do you find this useful? Like Roy’s site on Facebook!

The post “I revised my notes before the test.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
Improvise – don’t paralyze! https://www.anglaide.com/improvise/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 20:29:04 +0000 https://www.anglaide.com/?p=4653 Do you, as a learner of English, hesitate to speak because you know that at one point in the conversation, you will block and not know the right words? Saying the word or expression in French won’t help, because that person doesn’t speak it. And since there are well over 100,000 words in the English language, do paralyze and avoid the situation?  Learn to improvise!  Why? Well, what do you do when you drive and enter a section under construction, full of the famous orange cones for which Montreal is famous these days?  Do you just park and wait until the

The post Improvise – don’t paralyze! appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“I have a lot of job.” https://www.anglaide.com/lot-of-job/ Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:45:02 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2293 Why wrong: Job means emploi or un travail and most of us have many of them over our careers. If you mean things to do at your job, you mean work (du travail). Many Quebecers will say “J’ai de la job,” thinking that is English.  Sorry! To be taken seriously… Correct it:  Say “I have a lot of work.”  For more information, click here. Would you like more free information on what Roy can do for you?  Contact him without obligation.  He’s used to it.

The post “I have a lot of job.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“I couldn’t find a parking anywhere.” https://www.anglaide.com/parking/ Fri, 05 Oct 2018 16:05:28 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=1937 Why wrong:  Gerunds, noun-verb hybrids ending in -ing are usually non-count or mass nouns.  They refer to activities, such as swimming, smoking or camping.  If you see a sign that says “No parking” it means that the activity is forbidden there.  Mass nouns can’t be plural or take an indefinite article (a or an means one, which is a number). Sometimes, the same spelling can be used for a noun and a gerund (e.g.  an opening, a beginning or an ending). For more information, click here. Correct it: With gerunds, don’t use indefinite articles (a parking) or try to make

The post “I couldn’t find a parking anywhere.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“I’m agree with you.” https://www.anglaide.com/be-agree/ Tue, 25 Sep 2018 02:13:37 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2722 What do you mean?  You are agree with me? Why wrong:  Sometimes languages have different forms to say the same thing.  French uses the idiom être d’accord whereas English simply has a verb:  to agree. Correct it:  “I agree with you.” Would you like to learn over 1,000 English idioms? Contact Roy!

The post “I’m agree with you.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“All of the medias were there.” https://www.anglaide.com/medias/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 22:40:56 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2431 Why wrong:  The word medias  doesn’t exist. The word is media, an irregular plural, whose singular form is a medium.  Television is a medium, radio is another medium and the press is yet another one.  All of them together are the media. Correct it:  “All of the media were there.” Contact Roy.  He is a Cambridge English Teacher Advisor and can help you improve your vocabulary so as not to make embarrassing mistakes.

The post “All of the medias were there.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“My weekend was relax.” https://www.anglaide.com/relax/ Sun, 02 Sep 2018 04:05:17 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=2040 Why wrong: Relax is a verb in English. The adjective is relaxed (what you were) or relaxing (what the weekend was).  To be taken seriously… Correct it:  Say “My weekend was relaxing.” Do you need someone who will tell you the truth and challenge you? Contact Roy!

The post “My weekend was relax.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“We bought two new equipments.” https://www.anglaide.com/equipments/ Sun, 19 Aug 2018 20:36:29 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=1745 Why wrong:  Equipment, like information, is a non-count or mass noun. Mass nouns are used for masses like sand that are too big to count their individual parts.  That means that they can’t be plural or take an indefinite article (a or an means one, which is a number). In French, mass nouns are signified by du, de la or de l’.  For more information, click here. Correct it: With mass nouns, don’t use indefinite articles (an equipment) or try to make them plural (equipments). “We bought two new pieces of equipment.”. Would you like to help your employees improve their

The post “We bought two new equipments.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>
“Let me give you an advice.” https://www.anglaide.com/advice/ Fri, 10 Aug 2018 04:05:00 +0000 http://www.anglaide.com/?p=1527 Why wrong:  Advice, like information, is a non-count or mass noun. Mass nouns are used for masses like sand that are too big to count their individual parts.  That means that they can’t be plural or take an indefinite article (a or an means one, which is a number). In French, mass nouns are signified by du, de la or de l’.  For more information, click here. Correct it: With mass nouns, don’t use indefinite articles (an advice) or try to make them plural (advices). If you mean only one thing, say “Let me give you a piece of advice.”  If you

The post “Let me give you an advice.” appeared first on Anglaide.

]]>